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Sir James Black

Sir James Black

(1924 – 2010)

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United Kingdom

Sir James Black

Sir James Black
(1924 – 2010)

In memory of

Sir James Black

(1924 – 2010)
About Sir James
This is a tribute to James Black. Sir James Whyte Black, OM, FRS, FRSE, FRCP was a Scottish doctor and pharmacologist who was awarded the Nobel Prize for Medicine in 1988 for work leading to the discovery of Propranolol and Cimetidine.
Sir James Black was born in Uddingston, Lanarkshire, the fourth of five sons of a Baptist family which traced its origins to Balquhidder, Perthshire. He was brought up in Fife, educated at Beath High School, Cowdenbeath, and the University of St Andrews, where he studied medicine. Before 1967, including his time as a student, all of St Andrews' clinical medical activity took place at University College, which separated to become the University of Dundee, of which Sir James
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About Sir James
Black later became Chancellor. He joined the Physiology department at the University of St Andrews before taking a lecturer position at the University of Malaya.
Upon his return to Scotland in 1950, he joined the University of Glasgow (Veterinary School) where he established the Physiology Department. During his career he worked in both industry and academia. He was employed by ICI Pharmaceuticals (1958-1964), Smith, Kline and French (1964-1973) and the Wellcome Foundation (1978-1984) and was appointed professor of pharmacology at University College London (1973-1978) and King's College London (1984-1992).
Sir James Black contributed to basic scientific and clinical knowledge in cardiology, both as a
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About Sir James
physician and as a basic scientist. His invention of propranolol, the beta adrenergic receptor antagonist that revolutionised the medical management of angina pectoris, is considered to be one of the most important contributions to clinical medicine and pharmacology of the 20th century. His method of research, his discoveries about adrenergic pharmacology, and his clarification of the mechanisms of cardiac action are all strengths of his work.
He was greatly involved in the synthesis of cimetidine, at the time a revolutionary drug for the treatment and prevention of peptic ulcers. Cimetidine was the first of a new class of drugs, the H2-receptor antagonists.
Sir James Black was the Chancellor of the University
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About Sir James
of Dundee between 1992 and May 2006. In August 2006, the Sir James Black Centre was officially incorporated into the College of Life Sciences at the university.
He was created a Knight Bachelor in 1981. In 2000 Sir James Black was appointed to the Order of Merit by Queen Elizabeth II.
He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1976 and the same year he was awarded the Lasker award. In 1979, he was awarded the Artois-Baillet Latour Health Prize.
He was awarded the 1988 Nobel Prize in Medicine along with Gertrude B. Elion and George H. Hitchings for their work on drug development.
Sir James Black passed away on the 22nd March 2010. This is an online memorial dedicated to his memory. May he
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About Sir James
rest in peace.
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Sir James Black - tribute extract

Sir James Black

This is a tribute to James Black. Sir James Whyte Black, OM, FRS, FRSE, FRCP was a Scottish doctor and pharmacologist who was awarded the Nobel Prize for Medicine in 1988 for work leading to the discovery of Propranolol and Cimetidine.
Sir James Black was born in Uddingston, Lanarkshire, the fourth of five sons of a Baptist family which traced its origins to Balquhidder, Perthshire. He was brought up in Fife, educated at Beath High School, Cowdenbeath, and the University of St Andrews, where he studied medicine. Before 1967, including his time as a student, all of St Andrews' clinical medical activity took place at University College, which separated to become the University of Dundee, of which Sir James...

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Rest in peace Sir James
I first met Sir James at ****
My sincere condolences to all friends and family of Sir James
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